Press Releases

Thursday, October 5, 2017 8:35 AM

Note: Registration for this event will open on October 9, 2017. Go to www.iu5.org to access the registration link.

December 3-5, 2017

PDE’s SAS Institute, Innovative Students…Innovative Educators, is scheduled for December 3 – 6, 2017.  This year’s Institute will feature George Couros, author of “The Innovator’s Mindset: Empower Learning, Unleash Talent, and Lead a Culture of Creativity.” With the overarching theme of innovation, sessions on December 4 and 5 will focus on the following:

- Classroom Innovation - giving students a voice, choice and autonomy; where the teacher becomes a leader and facilitator (versus boss of the classroom and feeder of content).

- Leadership Innovation - leadership that influences others to move towards positive results.

- Technology Innovation - “…learning the technology is not the innovation; it is what you do with it that becomes “new and better” which embodies the innovation we seek.”

December 6, 2017

A Personalized Learning half-day session will offer attendees the opportunity to do a virtual tour of schools awarded personalized learning grants last year.  Schools include Central York Middle School, Hydetown Elementary School, North Montco Technical Career Center, Warrior Run High School, Indiana Junior High School, and Everett Area Elementary School.

A Priority and Focus Schools Leadership Academy is scheduled as an invitation only event; registration information will be sent directly to qualifying schools/LEAs.

Additional information:

Location:

Hershey Lodge and Convention Center, Hershey, Pa.

(Guaranteed check-in is 4:00 p.m.)

Registration Fees:

SAS Institute and Personalized Learning (Sunday – Wednesday):

$135 – SAS Institute and Wednesday Personalized Learning - Commuter

$485 – SAS Institute and Wednesday Personalized Learning with single room

$335 – SAS Institute and Wednesday Personalized Learning with double room

Act 45 Program (in addition to SAS Institute registration fee)

$150 – Act 45 Program (requires Sunday afternoon attendance.) Act 45 hours awarded upon successful completion of program.

SAS Institute (Sunday – Tuesday):

$100 – SAS Institute Registration – Commuter

$200 – SAS Institute Registration sharing a double room (must have a roommate pre-selected)

$350 – SAS Institute Registration (Sunday thru Tuesday) with a single room

Personalized Learning (Wednesday)

$35 –   Personalized Learning Registration - Commuter

$130 – Personalized Learning Registration with Tuesday evening lodging

There are no attendance quotas or restrictions.

Questions: Email sasevents@iu5.org.  

 
Wednesday, October 4, 2017 2:55 PM

LANCASTER, PA (Oct. 4, 2017)—Representatives from the Pennsylvania Principals Association, the statewide Pre-K for PA campaign, School District of Lancaster and Lancaster County Head Start today discussed high-quality pre-k and its effectiveness in providing a strong academic foundation before a child enters kindergarten, and urged the state to increase investments in this once-in-a-lifetime learning opportunity during a press conference at the Elizabeth R. Martin Elementary School.

The event highlighted the findings of a new report, Elementary School Principals Resoundingly Support Pre-K Investments, produced by the Pennsylvania Principals Association in partnership with the statewide Pre-K for PA campaign. The report shows nearly 99 percent of elementary school principals agree that publicly funded, high-quality pre-k is an important tool for preparing children for kindergarten, particularly those at risk.

“In my school, I see the long-lasting benefits of high-quality pre-k. It provides a foundation which enables these children to be confident and successful in their journey through school and in their personal lives as well,” said Dr. Barbra Andrews, Principal of Elizabeth R. Martin Elementary School. “That’s why I support stronger, meaningful investments in high-quality pre-k, so that every child – especially those at risk of school failure – can access early learning that prepares them for lifetime success.”

Elementary principals’ perceptions confirm research that shows that high-quality pre-k is especially beneficial for children from low-income families, helping put them at the same starting line as their more economically advantaged peers by the time they start school.

Stacy Lewis, Director of Lancaster County Head Start added, “Children that experience high-quality pre-kindergarten see themselves as capable learners and walk through the kindergarten door not just ready but eager to keep learning. However, there are still more than 1,000 at-risk children in the School District of Lancaster that do not receive high-quality pre-k, but are eligible.”

Approximately 64 percent or 2 in 3 eligible preschoolers don’t have the opportunity to attend publicly funded, high-quality pre-k.

According to the report, more than 97 percent of elementary school principals in the Commonwealth strongly agree or agree that additional state investments in publicly funded, high-quality pre-k should be made. They join an ever-growing list of supporters who have articulated strong support for state funding increases in pre-k, which also includes governors and legislators from both sides of the aisle, business and education leaders, law enforcement officials, high-ranking military officers, pediatricians and world-class athletes.

In addition, principals, who are on the frontline of delivering quality education, reported they can easily distinguish between those students who attended high-quality pre-k and those who missed this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

“When a child enters kindergarten unable to recognize some letters and numbers, complete a puzzle, or lacks other skills that can set that child on a path to succeed in school, that child is at an unfair disadvantage,” said Dr. Paul Healey, Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Principals Association.

“Principals face challenges ensuring that child can reach his or her full potential. If every child who needs it had access to high-quality pre-k, we would see fewer children struggling or needing special education or remediation. We would see more self-confident children who love education as much as we do.”

Responses to the survey were received from a diverse group of rural, suburban and urban school principals who are responsible for educating nearly 60 percent of elementary students statewide. They reported improvements in age-appropriate behaviors and the ability to reach academic milestones in students who attended high-quality pre-k.

“Too many children at risk of school failure miss the opportunity to attend high-quality publicly funded pre-kindergarten. Pre-k works! Decades of research has proven it and this survey adds the validation of Pennsylvania’s elementary principals to the value of the public investment,” said Joan Benso, President and CEO of Pennsylvania Partnerships for Children, a founding member of the Pre-K for PA Campaign.

“Elementary School Principals Resoundingly Support Pre-K Investments” is available at  www.paprincipals.org or www.prekforpa.org.

 

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Wednesday, October 4, 2017 11:02 AM

MECHANICSBURG, PA (Oct. 4, 2017)—Representatives from the Pennsylvania Principals Association, the statewide Pre-K for PA campaign, Mechanicsburg Area School District, United Way of the Capital Region, the Learning and Play Center and the Mechanicsburg Learning Center today discussed high-quality pre-k and its effectiveness in providing a strong academic foundation before a child enters kindergarten, and urged the state to increase investments in this once-in-a-lifetime learning opportunity during a press conference at the Kindergarten Academy at Filbert Street.

The event highlighted the findings of a new report, Elementary School Principals Resoundingly Support Pre-K Investments, produced by the Pennsylvania Principals Association in partnership with the statewide Pre-K for PA campaign. The report shows nearly 99 percent of elementary school principals agree that publicly funded, high-quality pre-k is an important tool for preparing children for kindergarten, particularly those at risk.

“In my school, I see the long-lasting benefits of high-quality pre-k. Children come to school with a sense of confidence and the natural curiosity to learn. They are comfortable in the school environment and are eager to engage in next steps on their educational journey: socially, emotionally, cognitively, and physically. These children coming from high quality pre-k can focus their attention and regulate their behaviors,” said Kathy Healey, Principal of the Kindergarten Academy at Filbert Street.  

Elementary principals’ perceptions confirm research that shows that high-quality pre-k is especially beneficial for children from low-income families, helping put them at the same starting line as their more economically advantaged peers by the time they start school.

Tim Fatzinger, President and CEO of United Way of the Capital Region added, “United Way of the Capital Region and our community partners want to move the needle on education disparities in our region. The best way to accomplish this is to help level the playing field for all children by providing early education opportunities to ensure they are ready to succeed in school when they enter kindergarten.”

Approximately 64 percent or 2 in 3 eligible preschoolers don’t have the opportunity to attend publicly funded, high-quality pre-k.

According to the report, more than 97 percent of elementary school principals in the Commonwealth strongly agree or agree that additional state investments in publicly funded, high-quality pre-k should be made. They join an ever-growing list of supporters who have articulated strong support for state funding increases in pre-k, which also includes governors and legislators from both sides of the aisle, business and education leaders, law enforcement officials, high-ranking military officers, pediatricians and world-class athletes.

In addition, principals, who are on the frontline of delivering quality education, reported they can easily distinguish between those students who attended high-quality pre-k and those who missed this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

“When a child enters kindergarten unable to recognize some letters and numbers, complete a puzzle, or lacks other skills that can set that child on a path to succeed in school, that child is at an unfair disadvantage,” said Dr. Paul Healey, Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Principals Association.

“Principals face challenges ensuring that child can reach his or her full potential. If every child who needs it had access to high-quality pre-k, we would see fewer children struggling or needing special education or remediation. We would see more self-confident children who love education as much as we do.”

Responses to the survey were received from a diverse group of rural, suburban and urban school principals who are responsible for educating nearly 60 percent of elementary students statewide. They reported improvements in age-appropriate behaviors and the ability to reach academic milestones in students who attended high-quality pre-k.

“Too many children at risk of school failure miss the opportunity to attend high-quality publicly funded pre-kindergarten. Pre-k works! Decades of research has proven it and this survey adds the validation of Pennsylvania’s elementary principals to the value of the public investment,” said Joan Benso, President and CEO of Pennsylvania Partnerships for Children, a founding member of the Pre-K for PA Campaign.

“Elementary School Principals Resoundingly Support Pre-K Investments” is available at  www.paprincipals.org or www.prekforpa.org.

 

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Wednesday, October 4, 2017 8:43 AM

Something big is happening here. Governments, nonprofits, donors and educators are gearing up to try to solve two intractable, and seemingly disparate, problems — at the same time. The first one is that not enough children are learning the basics. The second is that the basics are no longer enough. 
NPR.org, Oct. 4, 2017
Full story

 
Wednesday, October 4, 2017 8:40 AM

Pennsylvania's hotel tax rate would nearly double and Philadelphia and Pittsburgh would have the nation's two highest combined state-and-city hotel taxes under a proposal surfacing Tuesday in the House of Representatives to fill state government's $2.2 billion projected deficit.
Associated Press, Oct. 3, 2017
Full story

 
Tuesday, October 3, 2017 9:27 AM

Even among the charter schools — both brick-and-mortar and cyber — there’s a wide range of compensation that, in some cases, doesn’t appear to always be tied to academic achievement or school size.
Public Source, Sept. 28, 2017
Full story

 
Tuesday, October 3, 2017 9:26 AM

Lawmakers returned to the Pennsylvania Capitol amid a three-month-old budget stalemate Monday, but optimism from top Republican lawmakers about an evolving proposal to fill a $2.2 billion revenue gap did not translate into action. 
Associated Press, Oct. 2, 2017
Full story

 
Monday, October 2, 2017 9:03 AM

The districts are making plans to accommodate students with a unique set of needs: Some coming from the Caribbean island have limited English skills, some are already weeks behind because island schools have been closed since Hurricane Irma, and others will be dealing with trauma from living through the storm and its aftermath.
WITF, Oct. 2, 2017
Full story

 
Monday, October 2, 2017 9:01 AM

Gov. Tom Wolf’s administration is trimming what amounts to two days off the standardized tests given in grades 3 through 8. In addition, a push is underway to halt plans to require a student to receive a passing grade on the Keystone Exams, end-of-course tests in algebra, biology and English, to receive a high school diploma.
Allentown Morning Call, Sept. 30, 2017
Full story

 
Monday, October 2, 2017 9:00 AM

GOP leaders in Pennsylvania say they're optimistic they'll have some kind of budget framework to present to members this week. The House and Senate are both scheduled to convene Monday.
WITF, Oct. 2, 2017
Full story

 
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